pull together

pull together
verb
assemble or get together (Freq. 1)
-

gather some stones

-

pull your thoughts together

Syn: ↑gather, ↑garner, ↑collect
Ant: ↑spread (for: ↑gather)
See Also: ↑gather up (for: ↑gather)
Derivationally related forms: ↑collection (for: ↑collect), ↑collecting (for: ↑collect), ↑gather (for: ↑gather)
Hyponyms:
mobilize, ↑mobilise, ↑marshal, ↑summon, ↑rake, ↑reap, ↑harvest, ↑glean, ↑club, ↑hive, ↑salvage, ↑scavenge, ↑muster, ↑rally, ↑come up, ↑muster up, ↑round up, ↑pick, ↑pluck, ↑cull, ↑nut, ↑snail, ↑birdnest, ↑bird-nest, ↑nest, ↑oyster, ↑sponge, ↑pearl, ↑clam, ↑shock, ↑pile up, ↑heap up, ↑stack up
Verb Frames:
-

Somebody ——s something

-

Somebody ——s somebody

-

Something ——s something

* * *

cooperate in a task or undertaking

* * *

pull together [phrasal verb]
1 : to work together as a group in order to get something done

It was amazing to see so many people pull together to help the poor.

2 a pull together (someone or something) or pull (someone or something) together : to bring (people or things) together and organize them in order to make or do something

She managed to pull a team of researchers together.

He started his research by pulling together all the available data.

2 b pull together (something) or pull (something) together : to make (something) by bringing together different things

The chef pulled together a menu of American and Italian cuisine.

The boss asked her to pull a brief sales report together.

3 pull (yourself) together : to become calm again : to control your emotions and behavior after you have been very upset, emotional, etc.

I know you're upset, but you need to pull yourself together. [=calm down]

• • •
Main Entry:pull
————————
pull together — see pull, 1
• • •
Main Entry:together

* * *

ˌpull toˈgether derived
to act, work, etc. together with other people in an organized way and without fighting
Main entry:pullderived

Useful english dictionary. 2012.

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  • pull together — {v.} To join your efforts with those of others; work on a task together; cooperate. * /Many men must pull together if a large business is to succeed./ * /Tim was a good football captain because he always got his teammates to pull together./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

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